Will Dillingham

Recent Posts

Gyroscopes and the History of Stabilization for Remote Weapons Stations

Posted by Will Dillingham on May 11, 2020 5:43:09 PM
What is a Remote Weapons Station?

A Remote Weapons Station (RWS) is a remotely operated weapons platform that utilizes light and medium caliber artillery shells. Typically, an RWS contains sensing components (angular rates, accelerations, etc.), motor drives, a turret, and a computer. Today, companies like Electro Optic Systems Pty Ltd are patenting next generation Electro Optic RWS that are gyro-stabilized, combat ready, and built for precision targeting(1).

Since the two most important characteristics for an RWS are aiming speed and accuracy, advanced methods of stabilization are required to ensure that targets are correctly dealt with. The most important component in this task is the gyroscope.

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Topics: Insider, Stabilization, Aiming, Pointing, orientation

How Drones are Transforming Construction and Infrastructure Inspection

Posted by Will Dillingham on Apr 6, 2020 10:00:00 AM

Ensuring our infrastructure is running, and our job and construction sites are safe should be a top priority. However, the maintenance and inspections needed is inherently dangerous and often time-consuming and repetitive, making drones instrumental and valuable tools.

Drones can capture all kinds of data from images and videos, LiDAR scanning, mapping data, and a variety of data types related to air conditions, location, and precision location, including inertial data. As a result of using drones for these initial inspections, we can more quickly pinpoint the location and cause of the problem, and ensure that fewer humans are put in harm’s way.

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Topics: GPS-Aided Navigation, Surveying, UAV, Industrial

Using Optics to Stabilize and Simulate Indirect Fire Control

Posted by Will Dillingham on Apr 1, 2020 3:30:00 AM

Optical data, when fused with an IMU, is useful for both dynamic and static applications depending on the level of computer vision implemented into the system. By using the IMU as a reference for orientation, optical data can be used to mitigate drift of the gyroscopes.

So how does a complex system take into account multiple forms of data from different systems? By recognizing the best qualities of each source.

By themselves, each sensor in a complex system is vulnerable to many sources of error. For the OptoAHRS-II, the trick is to use a combination of sensors that each compliment the others weaknesses.

For an IMU, drift of the gyroscopes is the biggest flaw; which is where optical data comes to the rescue. If the system can recognize that the frame of reference is not moving, then biases can be ignored, preventing the IMU from drifting in it's orientation calculations...

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Topics: Stabilization, Aiming, Pointing, orientation, Simulation

Direct Georeferencing for Photogrammetry Using Inertial Labs INS-B

Posted by Will Dillingham on Mar 27, 2020 10:30:00 AM

Aerial Photogrammetric analysis may be applied to a single image or high-speed imagery and remote sensing to detect, measure and record complex 3D motion fields.

This is done by feeding measurements and image analysis into computational models that estimate the relative motions and positions with increasing accuracy.

While in its early days it was used mostly for topographic mapping, it’s application base has recently expanded into numerous industries. Modern sensors and software capabilities allow for the creation of precise 3D renderings and point cloud generation which is widely used in industries such as Filming, Sports, Game Development, Agriculture, Real Estate, Forensics, Land Surveying, and in Civil or Architectural Engineering.

For these different applications, two methods of photogrammetry are used in practice today, Aerial Triangulation (AT), and a more modern approach, Direct Georeferencing...

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Topics: GPS-Aided Navigation, Mapping, Navigation, UAV, Photogrammetry

Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS) Supports Data Input From External Single or Dual GNSS Receiver

Posted by Will Dillingham on Mar 20, 2020 5:45:00 AM

The AHRS-II-P offers advantages over its competitors present on the market by recording and transmitting very accurate Heading, Pitch and Roll; a very appealing choice for applications involving motion control such as UAV’s, aircrafts, ships, or robotic devices.

After the ARHS-II-P is mounted onto it’s carrier base, a quick calibration procedure is performed and the device is ready to go. Among the many ways to perform these calibrations procedures, the most mention worthy is the Inertial Labs option for an ‘On-the-Fly’ calibration.


Test Results of the AHRS-II-P with External GNSS Input

For this test procedure, the Inertial Labs AHRS-II-P was mounted to the floor of a test vehicle. The external GNSS receiver was mounted to the ceiling, and the respective antenna was mounted on the roof of the vehicle. The test duration was approximately 25 minutes long, and was performed at an average speed of 25 mph (11.18 m/s) in the suburban area shown in the picture below...

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Topics: Stabilization, Aiming, Pointing, orientation


Inertial Labs Inc.

Solutions for all PNT Applications

Established in 2001, Inertial Labs is a leader in position and orientation technologies for commercial, industrial, aerospace and defense applications. Inertial Labs has a worldwide distributor and representative network covering 20+ countries across 6 continents and a standard product line spanning from Inertial Measurement Units (IMU) to GPS-Aided Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). With application breadth on Land, Air, and Sea; Inertial Labs covers the gambit of inertial technologies and solutions.

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